Author Topic: Anchor / wooden  (Read 125 times)

Alvaroaponte

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Anchor / wooden
« on: March 19, 2021, 06:15:09 AM »
We were pulling the anchor up and the anchor got caught on a rock and the wooden part that extends at the front of the sailboat and holds the anchor and chain in place broke in half. Who can help me with ideas to replace the wood / what wood is typically used and are there other alternatives?
 Thanks!!!!

S/V Deo Volente

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Re: Anchor / wooden
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2021, 10:44:48 AM »
That looks familiar! When mine broke in a storm a few years ago the marina had done a 367 with 1" of G10 covered with teak. I decided to put rollers on top rather than reuse the original rollers. This sprit could be used as a ram it's very strong.
"S/V Deo Volente"
Pearson 365 Pilothouse
Hull #17 1980
Duluth Minnesota
Bob

Jim S

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Re: Anchor / wooden
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2021, 04:41:09 PM »
The instructions that came with the original 365 stated that the bow platform was an anchor storage device, not an anchor retrieval device.  With that in mind, a few owners beefed up the platform with bob stays.  Others shortened the platform to the extent that retrieval was possible.  This is the approach I took on Phantom.
Jim S

Dale Tanski

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Re: Anchor / wooden
« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2021, 08:02:43 AM »
Somewhere along the way there were photos of the bow sprit refurbishment I did on Maruska, but I cannot find them now.  I preemptively made the modifications after reading all of the problems owners had with overloading and damaging the anchor sprit.

In short, what I did is remove the cross bolts (threaded rod) that hold all of the strips of teak together.  I then routed out a groove (with a router) in each of the continuous length strips. The grove was close to the depth of the wood itself.  I then inserted stainless flat strips into the grooves. The groove and the strips were sized appropriately so that the strip fit snug and completely inside the wood.  You could only see the strips from the bottom of the sprit. I then roughed up the surface of the stainless strips with a sander and coated the strips with epoxy bedding them into each groove.  I re-drilled the cross holes through the stainless strips to re-insert the threaded rods and replugged the teak end holes.  The 5 or 6 stainless strips on edge embedded into the teak assembly were strong enough to drive a car across and I often keep the load of the boat on the outer roller.

Just another way around it all...

Dale Tanski
Maruska
Hull #40
"Maruska"
Pearson 365 Cutter Ketch
1976 Hull #40
Buffalo, N.Y.

S/V Deo Volente

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Re: Anchor / wooden
« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2021, 03:37:05 PM »
The instructions that came with the original 365 stated that the bow platform was an anchor storage device, not an anchor retrieval device.  With that in mind, a few owners beefed up the platform with bob stays.  Others shortened the platform to the extent that retrieval was possible.  This is the approach I took on Phantom.
Yes, I noticed the Pilothouse and the 367 had a slightly thicker teak platform, but I still added a stainless tube support which was quite strong for a vertical load. What caused the failure on mine was strong sideways loading from microbursts. It was quite a storm, I registered 85mph on my anemometer, and the wind switched several times so the platform was loaded from both sides alternately.
"S/V Deo Volente"
Pearson 365 Pilothouse
Hull #17 1980
Duluth Minnesota
Bob