Author Topic: What do you use for a tender?  (Read 294 times)

S/V AMITY

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What do you use for a tender?
« on: January 09, 2020, 09:24:28 AM »
  Interested to hear what tenders the group here uses.  Also how they manage them underway... tow or davits or on the foredeck.  Cheers!

S/V Legacy

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2020, 12:11:00 PM »
I have a 9'8" inflatable w/ an inflatable keel. Powered by a 9.9 mercury 4 stroke. Store the dingy on the bow and the outboard on the back railing.
Scott May
1980- 365 Ketch #307
S/V Legacy

S/V AMITY

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2020, 12:38:11 PM »
I had a Yamaha 3 on my 9' inflatable last season.  Way too slow but easy to lift off to store on the stern pulpit.  Have "upgraded" to an Evinrude 6... as pictured.  I like the old OMC's because most parts are readily available at low cost.  Should plane the dinghy with two aboard.  Weight's not too bad... lower than a comparable 4-stroke of same hp.  Plus if it gets stolen, I'm only out $150.

Since last season was a short one for me (AMITY purchased in mid-July), never got around to working out the program for getting the dink up, flipped over & onto the foredeck.  Advice on your procedure for that welcome.

S/V Legacy

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2020, 01:52:13 PM »
First i use the mizzen to lift off the outboard and onto the back rail. I used my spinnaker halyard to lift the dingy up to the fore deck. Attached to halyard to the tow bridle points. My halyard runs back to the cockpit to a winch, so I have someone crank the winch while i control the dinghy into position. My dinghy is fairly light since its not a RIB, a bit less than a 100lbs.
Scott May
1980- 365 Ketch #307
S/V Legacy

Dale Tanski

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2020, 02:17:03 PM »
There is a cool alternative out there for handling your dingy off of the stern.  The biggest advantage of the system shown in the attached link, is that the dingy is actually attached to the transom (strongest point) while towing so there is no lines or tow rings to be concerned about.  Once at anchor you can flip it up to get it entirely out of the water and keep rain from collecting in the tender.  Check it out, it is a cleaver design.  Also remember, that you gain approx. 30% on your dollar as the company is Canadian.

http://www.dinghy-tow.com/

Dale
Obersheimers
Maruska
"Maruska"
Pearson 365 Cutter Ketch
1976 Hull #40
Buffalo, N.Y.

S/V AMITY

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2020, 02:32:54 PM »
Dale... interesting concept.  Seems to solve some problems.  Would need to flip the dink up pronto in any following sea. 

S/V Legacy... Sounds good. Sometimes I'm single handed so would need to rig up a turning block and lift with the windlass capstan.  Regarding lifting points, have you attached (glued on) any special lifting rings?

Dale Tanski

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2020, 07:22:03 AM »
The weak point when attempting to lift or tow an inflatable is the pad eye rings.  I have never been a fan of inflatables for several reasons and the attachment points are just one.  We replace many that were torn off from an accumulation of rain water while on davits or a bad wave while towing.  The recommended repair method from the manufactures is to clean thoroughly and use contact cement! 
We do install eye bolts in the transom facing in to lift from but the bow section is an issue.  I would recommend you use a line or thin strap under the boat as best you can using the front eyes to try an keep that strap from moving. 
Rigid hulls are much better but even they require lifting bars to do the job properly and of course you are fighting all of that extra weight. 
You know... they were designed to deflate, roll up and shove in one of your storage areas on the boat.  Yea, right...

Dale
"Maruska"
Pearson 365 Cutter Ketch
1976 Hull #40
Buffalo, N.Y.

S/V AMITY

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2020, 07:50:52 AM »
My inflatable would be easy to deflate & roll up if it wasn't for the floor boards.  They are a bear to remove & install.  Once assembled & inflated, it stays that way for the season.

S/V Legacy

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2020, 12:12:19 PM »
Thats a good point Dale about installing eyes. My inflatable is new and i haven't considered that lifting it would weaken them. It is a light inflatable but could be lifted from the transom just as easy i suppose.
Scott May
1980- 365 Ketch #307
S/V Legacy

S/V AMITY

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2020, 12:26:50 PM »
Will be adding a couple of these to the dink.  The D-rings that are on the tubes now don't look suitable for lifting.

eveningebb

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2020, 01:13:42 PM »
I've got an 8 1/2 foot Zodiac PVC airfloor that has served me well the last 10 years (even in the sun at 12 degrees north).  I've replaced the airfloor once, the zodiac decals are gone, and the transom has lost much of its paint, but that's pretty good since it's been in the Caribbean for 7 of those years.  It lives on my foredeck during passages or when I'm off-island.  I can pull it up on deck and launch it fairly easily by myself.  I use a 3.5 hp 2-cycle Tohatsu which is easy to pull up onto the stern railing.  The engine is also easy to work on and pushes me as fast as I need.

I'm starting to think about heading west again and my dream dinghy would be an OC270 from OC Tenders a New Zealand company [https://octenders.co.nz].  There was one in the bay here and it was really cool.  Although, I must admit there's something nice about having an old beat-up dinghy with a small engine -- no one will ever think to borrow, appropriate, or take it for a joyride.

Dirk
« Last Edit: January 10, 2020, 01:15:48 PM by eveningebb »
S/V Evening Ebb
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http://www.sailblogs.com/member/eveningebb

Dale Tanski

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2020, 02:54:18 PM »
Hey Dirk!
I am flabbergasted that a PVC boat, anybody's boat would last that long in the sun.  Hypalon at twice the price is always the manufactures recommendation.  I am a Tohatsu dealer.  Great outboards.  Take good care of that 3.5 Hp 2 stroke as since 2006 they are not available for purchase any more in any non third world country.  You can still buy a brand new one down in the islands but not up here.  26 or so pounds soaking wet.  They do everything well but they have quite the appetite for fuel and that internal tank doesn't last long.
Those OC Tenders are indeed lovely, I am a big fan of a hard boat.  If I had your money I would have two and the carbon version to boot! It would be cool if they had a sail kit.
Opinions on tenders are like discussions on anchors. OMG!

Dale
"Maruska"
Pearson 365 Cutter Ketch
1976 Hull #40
Buffalo, N.Y.

S/V AMITY

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2020, 03:38:44 PM »
 Truth be told, my all time favorite dink is our Dyer with sailing option.  Been in the family since '58.  Rows well & sails well.  No rubber blowup dink can match the old girls for longevity if you give them a bit of love.

 1959 picture of sister, brother & me heading for shore in Norway.   Other picture is her getting prepped for Awlgrip in Connecticut last fall.  Yes, she's been around some.  She may be the one that gets to be on the davits.

SVJourney

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2020, 08:52:00 PM »
Wow!  Was that a Dirk siting?  Update your blog and let us all know howyadoin' eh buddy?

"We do install eye bolts in the transom facing in to lift from but the bow section is an issue.  I would recommend you use a line or thin strap under the boat as best you can using the front eyes to try an keep that strap from moving" 

I made do on a West Marine 310 RIB by installing eye bolts in the transom and turning the towing eye in the bow backwards so that the eye was on the floor of the dingy thus giving me 3 hard points into the fiberglass to lift the dingy up on the davits.  Only problem was that the bow ring became a toe killer if you weren't careful.
I do love RIBs for general getting around and beaching and planing, etc.  I don't think they are all that great for a 365.  They just don't stow well. 
www.GalleyWenchTales.com is our cruising blog.  Stop in and see our 365 through over 17000 miles of cruising.

Jim S

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Re: What do you use for a tender?
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2020, 09:23:10 PM »
I have the Nissan branded 3.5hp 2 stroke.  Forever old and runs great, it tugboated me in to our slip when the engine quit and I did not have towing.  The sailing club always laughed at my dinosaur, but it usually was the only outboard that ran.
Jim S